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20130228
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what the use is financial services. >> thank you. >> sorry, i forgot, it has been a wild to ask if you will accept these? and unfortunately... we did not make all of the copies. >> has the appellant seen this? >> no, we just got these today. i have not shown them to him. >> we do have a copy. sorry. >> did you hand in a copy? >> we just came... yeah. >> we just received these today. >> you just received the documents on the secretary of state. >> unfortunately we just ordered them this afternoon. they did not come from the secretary of state it came from their website. >> okay >> could you tell me what is on them, again? >> could you tell me what is represented in the documents? >> sure. there is a website of the secretary of state, which is called business entity details and the entity name is vocal point network, llc, it is active in california, it is address is in oakland. the principal is alfred chan who is indeed with who my client has interacted. and that is one piece of paper. the other is an irs statement, it is a letter to vocal point financial network. in care of mr. alfred c
that is in question and the changing of the use to vocal point. and while it seems that most of the attention to this property came about because of the conditional use application that they have on file for a wireless facility, what is going on here and the activity is not related to the wireless facility that they have an application in for but in relation for the change of use for this business and professional service use. the definition, well back up a little bit. so the terevel cd which was created last year does tend to add a little bit of confusion. the business and professional businesses listed adds the principally permitted use. however when you look at the street frontage controls it cross-references section 145.4 which is 145.4 c, which lists the active commercial uses and it says that if it is not on that list, then it needs a conditional use authorization and then the planning commission heard this legislation in june of last year and it was very clear to them what the supervisor's intent was on this legislation and so i have highlighted on the overhead is a passage that all of
. >> anything you might want to add to that? >> yes, they're called a clean circuit. you use the m.c. cable or 12-three, 12-2, the whole circuit. the computer or the microwave. >> so if you can probably do it, it sounds like putting in some kind of metal conduit-clad cable or something that will really reduce the interference. read for me what all these little things mean here. let's tip it up a little bit. >> priority a.w.g. 6-3 type s.o.o. w 600 volt sunlight and water resistant. >> which means what? >> it means it's a cord rather than a cable or wire. the cord is not to be used for permanent wiring. this is a cord that is designed for temporary power. >> it's a big cord. >> it is, it's 50 amp. >> what do they mean when they say primary? >> i don't know what it means. american wire gauge, the six is the size of the aware, the 3 is the three conductors, the type s.o.o.w., that's extra hard use cord. the w stand for wet. 600 volts is the volts it's good for and in the sun and underwater. it's 90 degrees centigrade-rated. it can run as high as 180 degrees without deterioration. this can get
there and spend time with these folks day in and day out, not only built trust between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to take our lesson
stuff. complicated stuff. what could this possibly be used for? we have with us today, david green, senior electrical inspector who is a good friend of mine and a well-known sailor on the san francisco bay. you're going to sail this saturday. and mr. lloyd and mrs. lloyd. thanks for letting us come in here. really appreciate it. you're an electrical contractor, too. right? >> i'm electrical for 26 years. we do lots of big projects. we dot lots of industrial and commercial and residential. >> so you have to get a california special license. you have to be a special licensee to do electrical what is that license? >> yes. i have a c-10 licen and b license. >> b is a general contractor's license. >> yes. more interesting for me, i do a lot of c-10 for electrical. >> about three, four years ago you opened up a supply house. >> we opened e & e electric for around five years. >> you don't have so many guys out on the field any more. >> no more. i just have a lot of contractors. they come in for a lot of questions about national code. so if i understand, i tell them whatever i know. my kno
and would supply a 200-amp panel board. >> how big does it have to be for 400? >> two sets. or you can use something called 500 which is a conductor twice as big as this. >> hard to work with. >> you have the choices in installing. two sets of these or one set of 500's. >> when somebody orders this grounding electrode, how much do they usually order? >> by national code, we need 20 feet. >> 20 feet has to be buried. >> in the rebar. we need 20 feet. so whatever we need longer, we can cut extra. >> so 20 feet plus what it takes to get. >> whatever they want to. >> cut us off a little bit. >> david, let's talk about energy efficiency. i know fluorescent lights and bulbs are a big issues right now. people are changing old-style fluorescent bulbs. what's the old one, the new one and the savings? >> the standard of the industry were t-12. this was a four-foot lamp. the 12 stands for and and it's about four or five times more efficient than the typical incandescent light bulb. in the energy to increase energy efficiency. they have a more efficient standard. it's a two footer. it's called the t-8
the panel board that only supplies the receptacles that you're going to be using for the computer or sensitive equipment is one answer. you want to make sure that you install that circuit, the wires are remote from any radio frequency devices or any other circuits that might impose a radio frequency on them. >> what kind of wires would impose a radio frequency? >> it could be a computer, another computer, it could be the microwave oven. >> you want to separate is from any other -- >> ideally. if you're running your wires in a raceway or an armored cable that uses ferrous metal, that protects those conductors against these radio frequencies much better than nonmetallic cable. that would be another strategy. and then if you're in a commercial installation where it is really, really important, you put in isolation transformers adjacent to the equipment. that's the most expensive solution but the best solution is to actually put an isolation device right at your equipment. they also have filters that you can buy, but that's a commercial-grade installation. residentially, a dedicated c
to justify the interim use of the site. well, this is not required below grade extraction. it facilitated the building of the cable car. however, it then returned the property to its potential realization with an entitled residential project, which at its time was slightly too large, but that is not what we're discussing here. using an sud for an interim use and then tagging on a project which by necessity of demolition for the interim use would require cu without submitting proper drawings which, one, in approving sud and approving cu are required i think is unfathomable to me. this commission spent a lot of time against some of our convictionses at the time and we approved the project with the very thoughtfully executed design which with many tucks and twists and turns, but forward a project that the neighborhood was comfortable with at large. i support the design, although there were people who asked us to hold out and not approve. after so many years, as the audience here testified, this site needed a change. why can't this project not in good faith come back to this commission as a r
started using light green and dark green here. i do not think we're using the same definition that marin uses. we're using -- we're talking about 100% renewable in both the dark green and the light green option. correct? it's just the rec mix that will differentiate the light versus the dark. * >> so, correct. what we've presented were a series of 100% renewable portfolio. >> correct. >> and i think folks fell into the language of how do you describe the sort of premiumness of the green products that makeup that 100%. in order to express the differentiation between a heavily bucket 3 100% renewable program versus a less, a 5% bucket 3 versus an 85% bucket 3. >> which is different from marin, correct? >> very different from marin. >> i agree with the public commenters who said the definition of light and dark green is different than how it's being used here today. >> i don't know if we need different language or what we need to do, but i think that's important to clarify. * >> we need different language. >> yes. >> so whatever it means, whatever our options are that we're talki
societies, europe and elsewhere, though their rates of nonviolent crime and drug use are not that much different than ours. so if another country were to lock up its own people at the rate that we do, and if our rates of incarceration were more normative to the rest of the world, we would regard with that other country was doing as a massive violation of human rights. that's the way we would look at it. now, the other point here is what we're doing is not even consistent with american history. i mean, we had 500,000 people behind bars in 1980 and now we have 2.3 million, 2.4 million people behind bars and almost have 5,000 people behind bars just for a drug violation. there are as many people behind bars for a drug violation than we had for everything in 1980. it's not consistent with global standards and not consistent with our own history. it's costing a vast amount of money and i think what you see is for some of the d.a.'s and others are beginning to say enough is enough. we're seeing prison populations beginning to decline but when it comes down to the question,
objective being the fire itself. those work out for us here and we can go ahead and use those skills forward as well. thank you very much, we appreciate the opportunity. >> thank you, i'd like to thank our panelists and open it up to our group for any questions of our panelists today. yes, sir, secretary. >> there are a lot of things you can do in a forest that tend to make it easier it fight a fire like most importantly burning off the fuel during the wet season so there's less for the fire to feed on. to what extent in cal fire and all your other things do you encourage people to do things in their forest when you don't have a fire that make it easier and more effective in fighting the fire? >> it's an excellent question, sir. we spend a large time in cal fire on public education and prevention and also with respect to you were talking about fuel, the fuels program, or vegetation management program in cal fire, we have a robust program throughout the state where we are conducting burning operations and vegetation management with prieflt ranch owners and private land own
into our passwords. we use our state codes for graffiti. so, ours is like error 13.16-2. if you continuously go on and keep forgetting how to sign up, it's going to lock you out as well. now, i was going to show you guys how to set up one. everybody is scared in here to set up a facebook one. so, i'm going to show you some things that we do. any questions so far? all right. different things that we found on facebook as well with tagers. we had a tager four months ago * that was selling grenades, okay. he described them. he talked about them all on facebook. we got that over to atf and our gun squad and they took care of that issue right away. yeah, they were dummies, but the way he was describing them on the internet. there was a guy from russia that was on there talking about how he wanted them. i mean, it's big. i mean, it's crazy what some of these people do. the other things, too -- the other thing is when you do set up your facebook -- i have to tell but this, too. you can't just set up a facebook account and leave it and friend one person and hope to get more friends to c
enforcement here in california is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that comes down like a ton of bricks on indigent poor people and that's one of the reasons why i think this type of reform is a positive first step because if you aren't going to make drug possession illegal, at least make it a misdemeanor and not a felony. at least don't stigmatize and label an entire population of people as felons and p
that increase the cost if it were 100% renewable? >> [speaker not understood]. when it's a dry year for us in the hetchy system, it's typically a dry year for everyone, which means there's upward price pressure in the electric market. so, he yes, i would expect that prices would be higher. yes, we would have to purchase more. we would have to meet whatever our commitment was to our customers in terms of the level of renewables. 100% renewable, we'd need to meet 100% renewable in our purchase plan. we would need to meet the mix requirements as well for, you know, what renewable product consistent with state law. and, so, that would serve as the floor and you could exercise discretion beyond that as to what the mix would be. that would be how you could dial in the pricing that keep it affordable in a high wholesale price year. but it's all those moving parts that we need to be managing under a scenario where we don't have a committed price like the shell project, with the shell approach. >> um-hm. >> yes. >> if i could just go back to slide 5 just for a minute. >> sure. >> can you help me un
's tough to fit it in but it's important to fit it in and it will make us more effective. we did an exercise back in may in preparation for this and developed a pretty detailed concept of operations. we built load plan, timelines, spare parts lists, we really got into the weeds, thinking about the second and third tier effects, so i want my relief to understand that and i want him to know where that plan is so he can pull it right off the shelf if this ever happens and be ready to respond quickly instead of trying to figure this all out when we need to be getting underway. >> i'll boil mine down into just one, and that is i will pass to my relief to continue to support events like this and look for opportunities to continue to learn how we best in the military can integrate with our civilian and federal contemporaries to be prepared for an eventuality that we hope will never come, but we certainly should be prepared for. so the one thing i'm passing on is keep the momentum. >> thank you, all. one other benefit that was cited in the after action review and also was mentioned tod
an institutional perspective at the tactical level in the marine corps. that's an area where we could use some improvement. our forces deployed to the western pacific certainly understand this, and they pass it on among themselves. the forces we deploy from southern california and the east coast that float into theater understand disaster assistance and humantarian response very well. that hasn't quite migrated itself into the institutional arena in terms of forces stationed here in the united states as it would relate to defense support to civil authorities. i think that's primarily -- this is not a primary mission for us. it's something that we do pay attention to, of course, as we deploy overseas. not necessarily forces we have here in the states. we do understand immediate response, rolling out the gate to help our neighbors in an immediate nature, but i think not so much in terms of mobilization and deploying inside our country. so, this is an area where opportunities like san francisco fleet week will allow us for, and i believe at some point really incorporate this in some internal doct
very complex response, and then recognizing for us the supported commander was usaid that normally isn't in the emergency response business. so, it was an educational process of how to move forces and yet support usaid and the role of the country team and port au prince. so, it was very informative there. and to back up when we had the first no fooling hurricane that worked its way up the entire gulf coast, the principal committee calls that were generated during the haiti response were then turned around and then bringing all of the governors into a conference call with the president to make sure that all their needs were being met in the advance of a hurricane arrival. so, we really had all of government, from local all the way up to the white house, fully included in that response. but the haiti response was certainly informative in bringing all these disparate entities together to provide unity of effort during a response. >> we need general spiese. >> okay, thanks. i would offer a little bit from an institutional perspective at the tactical level in the marine corps. that's an
and sin no more. and if you do, you'll be back here to see us. and so, i think that once again, i go back to the fact that under the current system, because we have so many of those individuals who were once incarcerated at the state level, being pushed down to the counties, there's no room at the end in terms of the county jails. so misdemeanors aren't going to be sentenced to county jail but will be sentenced in community service or whatever. and for those individuals who do need some measure of control and supervision to deal about -- deal with their conviction problems, it's not going to happen at the misdemeanor level. >> let me go to a couple of the questions from the audience. i've shared them with our district attorney. george, two questions there, one related to whether or not drug possession should be treated differently for adults than from juveniles. and then a question about back on track, whether or not that program would be positively or adversely affected by senator leno's proposal. >> yes, let me start with the first question concerning juveniles. i think juveniles defini
lacked this ability that most of us take for granted, that is how they feel. hopefully, i did giving you a touch of a psychopathy for a nanosecond. how do we study people like him? we can transport him out from the present to the hospital. one of the things my lab does, we built a really nice trailer in new mexico. here is my trailer. i live in a trailer in mexico. [laughter] this trailer has a really nice mri in it. we work with inmates to volunteer force studies and how to make them better. what we have found is that individuals to have those psychopathic traits, only about a third of all inmates will score really high on the straights. they have reduced gray matter density in these areas. this is the same area where that guy had the tumor. these individuals, control and for all the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to an
and hang out with us for a couple days and see, maybe do some golfing with me and stuff, too, spying. we're open all the time for anybody to come. we're trying to get something like these people to come to phoenix, some time in the future to host one of these conferences. by all means, if you need anything again, i cannot stress to you enough, if i can't get you the answer i'll find the answer. i know a lot of people know. make sure you get hold of us. now that you have intel and a tager, you want to try examine go after, what do you do? this is all stuff that i've been successful with and maybe it can be successful for you. you guys have to find out. you have to take that jump. i was tired of doing misdemeanor after misdemeanor after misdemeanor. so, this is how we went and started doing the big felony investigations. now, before i move on, though, i talked to you guys about how to set up your yahoo! account, how to set up a facebook account. if you don't feel comfortable with that yet but you still want to do it, call me. i'll help you get that set up. okay. because i'm telling you, kn
with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several years. some of the questions that they ask, or issues that they speak to, like the alcohol licensing unit, that is because i heard you with regard to working with licenses, having security plans so there can be one pinpoint that everything can pass through. commanders are the successors and hopefully it will be around a while and always be resourced. it is really important that you take our input and that we come out for a safer event and that people are going to want to come to san francisco and that they will not have any trepidation again, i think the fact that everything is booming right now in san francisco would go a long way to say that we kind of got this thing figured out, but we can always get better. before i leave and pass it over
us is continuing to be just that. is that we want to minimize it and the whole idea that we could do no layoffs would be ideal. again, a commitment from the board will be to look under every rock and understand how funding relates to the continued success and progress of our students. and i think that we always have that in mind when we go through this process. and that is it is not a comfortable process to go through. and you know, again this required time frame makes it very difficult for us to do what we have to do and so i just wanted to openly put out our commitments as a board and i think that we have demonstrated that as a board time and time again and we will continue to work hard to find funding to make things happen and to really look at the best way to follow our strategic plan in order to ensure success for our kids. >> i thank you, and i just want to say that every year that i have been on this board and i tend to vote for this layoff notices and it is always really hard and i will say that it is very, very hard to send out over 500. so, i am just glad to see that the nu
that i use is two things that -- one of ours that we use in phoenix -- and again, this is one of the main reasons why people come to us is that gaolgraffiti hotline. our graffiti hotline program is almost like a silent witness. many are designed first to school age kids. any time we get grab eat aloe on the school we would take pictures up and put up a reward poster. we got a phoenix community alliance that has business members tire of graffiti that put money into this program. and we use it to reward people for calling others in on graffiti, up to $250. the point system, we go to a board once a month and talk about the different cases that we get and we reward these people up to $250. huge, great program in phoenix right now. lots -- and we don't just do it for conviction. you know what silent witness says? you can receive up to a thousand dollars upon conviction, not with the graffiti reward program. the graffiti hotline program, it's just minimum id of the tager because once we id them, we'll go and get them. sooner or later. the big thing that we do use, though, is graffiti tracker. i
with the back of my hand. i said use all 10 fingers, i'll buy you breakfast. checkpoint, security, two. i survived the situation, got on the plane. the point is this, that what's in my head i've never had to apologize for. first thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession unde
based, we might not see a whole lot of schools but he has a whole other job. we used to go out and do two performances a week so we were doing 16 or 18 but it's just -- with the manpower shortage, since 2007 our theater department has lost like 40 percent of what we usually do. i know that noel's department, he's lost people and programs and hopefully things are going to get better. >> it says a lot for the program when in rough budget times, we're still around. so we meet a lot of students. >> success stories of kids who were going the wrong way? >> as a matter of fact, the first couple semesters, where we did a break out session, where we break out with the teachers and their students and one of the actual kids said, you know, something is going on in my house, my brother's a gang banger, the house is abusive, and that breakout session, that child actually reached out to us. we were able to get dps to actually pull her out of her house so it's a good venue for those kids to express that. >> i had a fourth grader who told me, he said if they think i can do better in the world. he w
screening need to be, you know, used either in lieu of or in addition to and that's a very personal decision and a medical decision, but that added risk for those women who are already at higher risk from the very -- the detect is a really important issue, so does that answer your question? >> [inaudible]. >> awesome, okay, so schools, i've talked about some changes that can happen at schools but the reason we wanted to highlight this is because we can talk about federal laws, about state laws and it can feel daunting to think about getting involved in legislation at that level, although we try to make that easy for most to do by signing on to online actions and stuff, but for parents with kids, changing policies at schools can be an accessible thing, joining pta's or talking to the school board about having integrated pest management so kids aren't exposed to pesticides on playgrounds, that's been successful. there's a huge movement to get safer, healthier foods into schools and they just revised the school lunch guidelines, but also you could go organic, you could go local and there are sc
for those poor little whatevers that are difrplt than us, but we are all equal. the third one is working together and i think about the giants, we're all for the team, not all together not as if we are color blind and color doesn't exist but with our diversity. the fourth is with power and authority, the person who stands up and says this is what needs to happen, like a school principal who says we're not going to let kids go around the school saying that's okay, all these things are needed. >> i like that, that's great. something that really resonated with me that tom said, if you simply tolerate diversity you are aspiring to mediocrity. can you talk about the ambassadors, adults taking an active role to intervene when we witness bullying. >> all of us are humbled by the virus, how systemic it's become. how do you get your hands around that? for me it's top down and bottom up. we are authority figures and what we do for our children and that's care, but we need to empower them to become the leaders they are waiting to become. this notion of youth adult partnership is esote
and west of our valley. where is he going? so, then, using facebook i found out where his girlfriend was and she lives in glendale. so, they take pictures and it goes on facebook and you do the longitude-latitude and you can get kind of close to where it was. well, just so happened that he tagged at 27th avenue in glendale, right on the glendale and phoenix border, we start today set up on him and found out where his girlfriend lived. we sat on the house and caught him, okay. after we arrested mod, broad him in, same thing. sat down and interviewed him for hours. and, man, they cry. you see that? once you start getting into their -- thing that helped me with mine and like i said, i'm not an expert, but if i can use -- if you can use something for me to help make your investigation successful, i don't start off with why did you do this, what did you do -- i start off nice and slow. tell me a little bit about yourself. it's like an interview, okay. and they tell you. you find something like jugs didn't have a dad. he said, i didn't have a dad to kick my ass to keep me right.
taking an active role to intervene when we witness bullying. >> all of us are humbled by the virus, how systemic it's become. how do you get your hands around that? for me it's top down and bottom up. we are authority figures and what we do for our children and that's care, but we need to empower them to become the leaders they are waiting to become. this notion of youth adult partnership is esoteric in its term but on the ground how do you operationalize it, those things in the public school who are working so hard to meet the required mandates. schools are driven by mandates, academic achievement, achievement, enrollment. but the conditions in which the virus grows, if you follow the metaphor that bullying is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 265 (some duplicates have been removed)